No Plan In Place For Sites Of Demolished Baltimore Buildings | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

No Plan In Place For Sites Of Demolished Baltimore Buildings

Play associated audio

Cathy Duchamp

When a building gets demolished its usually a sign that something new will go up in its place. That’s not the case in Baltimore, where crews are tearing down historic rowhouses in the name of public health and safety.

An excavator crunches and munches through the first of nearly 70 boarded up row houses slated for demolition. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake told the assembled crowd vacant houses are a major public safety hazard.

"Removing such blight be it here or anywhere I feel is something that’s central to the success of our city," says Rawlings-Blake.

The speech got a nod from passersby. But resident Malachi Williams doesn’t think the vacant lots are good for the city either.

"That takes the neighborhood down, that takes the value, the next person, buying a house down the corner, that takes their property down," says Williams. "Build some houses back in the neighborhood and it will build the neighborhood back."

That was the plan. But city managers say the developer who wanted to build luxury rowhouses on this block couldn’t come up with the financing.

WAMU 88.5

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, Sept. 2

You can see a selection of Chinese films or meditate on the meaning of the word “axis” at an art exhibition.

NPR

These 5 Crops Are Still Hand-Harvested, And It's Hard Work

Saffron, vanilla, palm oil, cacao and cottonseed oil are still picked by hand in some parts of the world. Sometimes that manual labor shows up in the price of the food; sometimes it doesn't.
NPR

The Politics Of Calling In Sick

A growing grass-roots movement aims to establish paid sick leave in the U.S., enjoying some success at the city and state level. The issue is already playing big in 2014 political races.
NPR

Using Technology To Counter Police Mistrust Is Complicated

Police officers in Ferguson, Mo., are now wearing body cameras. But cameras don't solve everything. Sometimes, they can create more disputes.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.