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Parents Call For Rhee's Resignation After Budget Discrepancy

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By Peter Granitz

Some parents of D.C. Public School children are lashing out at Chancellor Michelle Rhee for laying off more than 260 teachers because of budget reasons, only to announce this week she has a surplus.

Rhee announced this week DCPS wasn't in the red at all--in fact, it was nearly $30 million in the black. D.C.'s Chief Financial Officer Natwar Ghandi needs to investigate the massive discrepancy.

Rhee hopes to use the money to pay for teacher raises in a new contract brokered with the teachers union.

Some parents say the budget error is inexcusable. Maria Jones accuses Rhee of shuttering too many schools, removing effective principals and leaving Ward 5, her home, with no middle school.

"To not know if you have budget surplus, you're not in communication with the chief financial officer so you don't know," says Jones. "Do you know or don't you know? Why would you fire these people based on that? That's crazy."

Jones, who sits on the board of the nonprofit Empower D.C. and the Ward 5 Council on Education, is calling for Rhees resignation.

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