: News

D.C.'s C.F.O.: "There Is No $34 Million Surplus"

Play associated audio

By Kavitha Cardoza

Just a few days ago, Chancellor Michelle Rhee told council members there was a $34 million in the D.C. Public School's budget to help fund the union contract agreement. But now the Chief Financial Officer says there is no such surplus.

In a sternly worded letter to Rhee, Dr. Natwar Gandhi says he was "incredulous" when he learned she had said a surplus would help fund the salary increases proposed in the union agreement. He says a projected underspending of $34 million is balanced out by more than $30 million in overspending.

George Parker, President of the Washington Teacher's Union, had just finished talking to teachers about the contract for about four hours when he heard the news.

"This is getting crazier and crazier!," shouts Parker.

But Parker insists this will not affect the contract.

"There has never been a linkage between a surplus and what we negotiated at the table. We were clearly told the funds would come from appropriated dollars they get from the city and the additional dollars from private funders. And that's what we expect there to be," he says.

The CFO's office has to sign off on the funding before teachers can vote on the contract.

NPR

Comic-Con Has Become Poké-Con

At this year's San Diego Comic-Con, one of the biggest phenomena isn't just inside the convention center, it's all around: Swarms of people staring at their phones as they play Pokémon Go.
NPR

Scraped, Splattered — But Silent No More. Finally, The Dinner Plate Gets Its Say

Instagram is the Internet's semi-obsessive, borderline-creepy love letter to food. But behind every great meal is a plate doing a pretty-OK job. So a comedian made an Instagram to celebrate plates.
NPR

4 Reasons Why Progressives Aren't Thrilled With Clinton's Pick Of Kaine

Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine's positions on Wall Street reforms and trade deals are already drawing the ire of groups who had backed Clinton's primary rival Bernie Sanders.
NPR

Making The Cloud Green: Tech Firms Push For Renewable Energy Sources

Few people can demand what kind of electricity they get. But Microsoft and Facebook, which operate huge, power-hungry data centers, are trying to green up the electricity grid with their buying power.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.