: News

Filed Under:

D.C. Voting Rights Bill Expected On House Floor

Play associated audio

By Rebecca Blatt

D.C. Delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton says she expects a D.C. Voting Rights bill to come to the House floor by next Thursday. House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer says the bill includes some version of an amendment repealing D.C. gun regulations.

Norton has spent the last year trying to shepherd the bill through the House without language repealing D.C. gun laws. A bill passed by the Senate included such an amendment.

But Norton says the gun rights forces in Congress have only gotten stronger. She says a repeal of gun regulations could be passed as a stand-alone bill.

Meanwhile, with strong Democratic control in Congress and support from President Obama, Norton calls this a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to secure voting rights.

Ilir Zherka, president of the advocacy group D.C. Vote, agrees.

"We're not going to accept defeat simply because our opponents have the votes to amend our bill on hot button issues like gun rights or marriage equality or medical marijuana or anything else," says Zherka.

The bill would add two new House members, one for the Democrat-heavy District and another for Republican-leaning Utah.


'Steve Jobs': As Ambitious As Its Title Character

Danny Boyle's new biopic, Steve Jobs, is a look at the man who made Apple mean computers, not fruit. NPR film critic Bob Mondello says it's an invigorating story told in three acts of crisis.

Could A Mushroom Save The Honeybee?

The bees that pollinate crops are on the brink of collapse. One big reason why: a virus-carrying mite. Now, researchers think a rare fungi could boost bees' immune system and attack the mite itself.

'Quartet' Member: Nobel Peace Prize Is 'Very Important For Tunisia'

NPR's Kelly McEvers speaks with Wided Bouchamaoui, president of the Tunisian Employers' Union, and a member of the National Dialogue Quartet in Tunisia, about winning the Nobel Peace Prize Friday.

Volkswagen Faces Uphill Battle In Repairing Tarnished Reputation

Volkswagen faces two enormous repair jobs: fixing its polluting diesel cars and its battered reputation. Both may be much harder to fix than anything other scandal-plagued car companies have faced.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.