Video Shows Prince George's Police Beating University Of Maryland Student | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Video Shows Prince George's Police Beating University Of Maryland Student

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By Kate Sheehy

Prosecutors in Prince George's County, Maryland have begun a criminal investigation of three county police officers who are shown on a video beating an unarmed University of Maryland student during a celebration after a basketball game.

In the video, two students skip down the sidewalk, celebrating Maryland's victory over Duke. Realizing police on horseback are in front of them they start to back away, but police in riot gear come at them from the side, and begin attacking one student with batons.

Twenty-one-year-old John McKenna's attorney released the video after charges against McKenna were dropped. Police have ordered an internal affairs investigation of the officers.

Police Chief Roberto Hylton says he is outraged by the video. He says one of the officers has been suspended during the probe and he plans to suspend the two others once they are identified.

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