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Mother Of Murdered Girl Pushes For Tougher Sex Offender Law

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Maryland House and Senate members race against the clock.
Elliott Francis
Maryland House and Senate members race against the clock.

By Elliot Francis

In its final session for 2010, the Maryland General assembly voted to approve a bill containing tougher penalties for sex offenders, including lengthening the mandatory sentence for sexual assault against a child younger than 13. The family of a slain 11-girl traveled to Annapolis to help see it through.

Jennifer Foxwell spent the day at the state house, talking with legislators and anyone else who'd listen. The conversations always circled back to Foxwell's 11-year old daughter.

"What happened to Sara was a huge wake-up call, and the lawmakers need to know that this needs to be put in place to protect our children," says Foxwell.

Police say Sara was kidnapped, assaulted and slain by a registered sex offender. Foxwell and other advocates pushed for mandatory lifetime supervision for severe offenders and more severe minimum sentences when the victims are children.

Foxwell says it's a matter of common sense.

"A lot of these pedophiles are repeat offenders. If we don't do something they will continue to harm our children and I don't want to sit back and watch that happen," she says.

Another sex offender bill waiting for the governor's signature would eliminate good-time jail credit for repeat offenders.

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