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Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley Ends 2010 Law Session With Signing 170 Bills

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Gov. Martin O’Malley signed a bill requiring the French national railroad to publish its Holocaust-era records if its U.S. subsidiary is to receive a state contract.
Elliott Francis
Gov. Martin O’Malley signed a bill requiring the French national railroad to publish its Holocaust-era records if its U.S. subsidiary is to receive a state contract.

By Elliott Francis

Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley fixed his signature to more than 170 bills today. The bill-signing marked the end of the 2010 legislative session.

In 90 days, state legislators approved more than 800 measures. It's often a contentious process, but Governor O'Malley said there was less partisanship than usual.

"This one was a session that was more collegial, more cooperative than any of the last four," says O'Malley.

O'Malley went right to work this morning signing the Maryland False Claims Act, which is expected to save the state millions of dollars. Also signed into law was a measure providing health insurance to certain uninsured residents before federal reforms take effect in 2014, and tougher penalties for gangs and sex offenders.

Among the 1,900 bills that didn't pass: a proposal to keep motorists from reading text messages while driving, one to legalize medical marijuana and one to bring limited gambling to Rose Croft Raceway in Prince George's County.

Today's signing was largely ceremonial. The governor is scheduled to sign the remaining bills next month.

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