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Georgetown Law Students to Help Low-Income Residents with Cases

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By Ginger Moored

In a new Georgetown University program, law students will tackle problems of low-income residents of the D.C. area.

This presents challenges not often found in classrooms.

The twenty students in the Community Justice Project will take on a variety of cases – some might work on getting HIV patients medicine while others might help homeless people find housing.

But professor Jane Aiken, who's running the program, says all students will learn to deal with tough cases.

People who do work for justice often come up against really hard things and if you haven’t had a sense of how to survive those times in which you appear to lose you get burned out.

Stacy Braverman can attest to that. She’s a lawyer at the non-profit Bread for the City. She says the challenges she encounters are hard to forget.

To have to break the news to somebody that they will imminently have to lose their home is a terrible thing to have to do. Almost every day I think to myself, you know, they did not teach us about this in law school.

And that's why Aiken wants her students to take on real-life problems as well as textbook case studies.

WAMU 88.5

A WAMU Guide To The 2015 National Book Festival

Need some help navigating the schedule? We've come up with an agenda that highlights authors we’ve spoken with here at WAMU.

WAMU 88.5

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, Sept. 2, 2015

You can plan for dinner and a show (for a cause) or check out a reggae concert.

WAMU 88.5

Europe's Ongoing Migrant And Refugee Crisis And The Future Of Open Borders

The Austria-Hungary border has become the latest pressure point in Europe's ongoing migrant crisis. An update on the huge influx of migrants and refugees from the Middle East and Africa and the future of open borders within the E.U.

WAMU 88.5

Environmental Outlook: How To Build Smarter Transportation And More Livable Cities

A new report says traffic in the U-S is worse than it's been in years. But some say there are reasons to be optimistic. For this month's Environmental Outlook: how revitalized urban centers and new modes of transportation are changing how we get around our cities.

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