: News

Filed Under:

Fines Start For D.C. Council Chairman Gray

Play associated audio
D.C. Council chairman and mayoral candidate Vincent C. Gray faces a daily fine for a building code violation.
Council of the District of Columbia
D.C. Council chairman and mayoral candidate Vincent C. Gray faces a daily fine for a building code violation.

WASHINGTON (AP) D.C. Council chairman and mayoral candidate Vincent C. Gray will be fined $300 a day for a building code violation.

D.C. Department of Transportation spokeswoman Karyn LeBlanc confirmed that her department will mail the first citation notice Tuesday and "each day until the matter is resolved."

On Friday D.C. Attorney General Peter Nickles scolded the agency and the Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs for threatening to fine Gray in letters but not acting. He is being fined for not filing a public-space permit application for a 6-foot-high aluminum fence he built around his house in 2008.

Gray's spokeswoman Doxie McCoy said Tuesday that Gray's attorney had been in contact with officials and that the necessary paperwork had been submitted.

Information from: The Washington Times, http://www.washtimes.com (Copyright 2010 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

WAMU 88.5

Rita Dove: "Collected Poems: 1974 - 2004"

A conversation with Rita Dove, former U.S. poet laureate and Pulitzer Prize-winner.

NPR

Frozen Food Fears: 4 Things To Know About The Listeria Recall

The FDA issued a massive recall of frozen fruits and vegetables this week. Here's what you need to know about the nasty bug that's causing all the problems.
WAMU 88.5

Back From The Breach: Moving The Federal Workforce Forward

A year after a massive cyber breach compromised the databases of the Office of Personnel Management, Kojo talks with OPM Acting Director Beth Cobert about her agency and key issues facing the federal workforce.

WAMU 88.5

Why Medical Error Is The Third Leading Cause Of Death In The U.S.

New research shows medical error is the third leading cause of death in the U.S., killing more than 250,000 people a year. Why there are so many mistakes, and what can be done to improve patient safety.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.