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Region Can Shrink Carbon Footprint As It Grows

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By Asma Khaled

A new report out this morning shows how developers can cut greenhouse gases, even as the region expands.

The report says the region expects to add 1.2 million people in the next 20 years. But the city also wants to drastically reduce its CO2 emissions. The Coalition for Smarter Growth says the region can grow and reduce its carbon footprint.

Cheryl Cort works with the Coalition. She says the Hyattsville Arts District is a good example in how smart development can curb carbon emissions.

"The arts district is about 25 percent lower than traditional single-use suburban development," says Cort.

Stuart Eisenberg heads the Hyattsville Community Development Corporation.

"You can build good compact development anywhere, but they won’t have as big a positive impact on the environment unless they’re built in the right place," says Eisenberg.

The key is developing accessible destinations. The report finds compact, mix-use development near a metro station could curb C02 emissions by more than 40 percent.

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