Neighborhood Businesses Hopeful For Customers During Summit | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Neighborhood Businesses Hopeful For Customers During Summit

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By Peter Granitz

Business owners near the Convention Center will soon learn whether the nuclear summit will be a boon or a bust for business.

Erroll Brown has owned the Euro Market on 7th and L streets for four years. He’s planning on staying open for business, unlike others in the neighborhood, even though that means he cannot get his deliveries.

He will have to go through tight security every time he enters the closed off perimeter in the morning, which means any supplies for the day he wants to bring in will have to be examined, too.

Still, Brown says he has reason to be optimistic.

“We have been told no food outlets will be open inside the building and they’re expecting around 1300 law enforcement personnel. Plus you have the support staff for the delegates. So hopefully they at the very least come out and get coffee,” says Brown.

Brown’s main concern-parking. The Annapolis resident says he’ll need to leave extra early to get in and find a place to park.

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