: News

Filed Under:

Inspiration in Rockville Comes "Out of the Flood"

Play associated audio
...and with a new collection of works at the Katzen.
Stephanie Kaye
...and with a new collection of works at the Katzen.

Many people have had to deal with floods that frequent the DC region. For one local artist, losing his life's work to water meant finding a new muse. Don Kimes was in New York when he got the call. "My neighbor called at ten o'clock at night and said, 'There's water coming out your front door.' I said, 'That can't be. That's the second floor of the house.'"

By the time he returned to Rockville, the water on the first floor was chest-high. The art that was his life's work was destroyed. Stacks of family photos became soggy clumps of pulp - including ones of his mother, who had recently passed away. "I had spent virtually all of two weeks trying to peel these photos apart, trying to salvage something of the image. And then I thought, 'There may be a kind of beauty in these pieces.'"

Out of disaster, inspiration. Kimes created large, colorful prints of his ruined photos, touched up with paint, and hopes they inspire others. The resurrected canvasses make up the show "Penitementi: Out of the Flood," on exhibit at American University's Katzen Arts Center through May.

Stephanie Kaye reports...

NPR

For Carl Phillips, Poetry Is Experience Transformed — Not Transcribed

Phillips' new collection is both raw and refined, drawing on intimate experience while shunning autobiography. "I become uncomfortable when people make an equation between author and poem," he says.
NPR

#NPRreads: Middle East Air Quality, Lead Poisoning, And Jell-O

Around the newsroom and around the world, here's what we're reading this week.
NPR

Donald Trump In 9 Quotes And 200 Seconds

Trump took his act on the road to Tennessee, where he thrilled a conservative audience with an off-the-cuff routine that bordered on stand-up comedy.
NPR

No More Standing By The Spigot: Messaging App Alerts Water Availability

A startup in India — where an aging, ad hoc system limits water availability — is using text messages to let people know when their faucets should work, so they don't waste hours awaiting the deluge.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.