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Virginians React To Confederate History Month

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Lexington, Va. leaders are considering banning the flying of the Confederate flag on city flagpoles.
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Lexington, Va. leaders are considering banning the flying of the Confederate flag on city flagpoles.

By Patrick Madden

Virginia Governor Bob McDonnell says he made a "major omission" when he proclaimed April Confederate History Month without noting slavery. McDonnell has now added a clause condemning slavery as "evil and inhumane". But in Fairfax County, the issue continues to spark controversy.

Outside the Starbucks in Seven Corners, McDonnell’s decree is on people’s minds.

"I still think the whole thing was absolutely unnecessary," says Jeff Gleason. He voted for McDonnell last fall but says he’s disappointed with the governor.

"Putting in the comments regarding slavery after the fact is backpedaling," he says.

But John, who doesn’t want to use his last name, says critics of the proclamation are overreacting.

"I think they are always making a mountain out of a molehill," says John. He says critics should back down.

"You know, always putting people down because they are bringing about the celebration or bringing this period of history out in the forefront, I think they would do better by not saying anything about it," he says.

But that doesn’t seem likely, as the controversy continues to stir strong emotions.

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