McDonnell Apologizes, But Not Everyone Satisfied | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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McDonnell Apologizes, But Not Everyone Satisfied

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By David Schultz

Virginia Governor Bob McDonnell has apologized for issuing a declaration that made April, "Confederate History Month." McDonnell had called on Virginians to honor Confederate soldiers.

But he did not mention the Confederacy's role in supporting slavery. The governor initially defended his declaration, but yesterday evening he issued a statement of apology, saying not dealing with the issue of slavery was a "major omission."

Bill Euille, the Democratic mayor of Alexandria, and one of the most prominent African-American politicians in Northern Virginia, says he's "dumbfounded by it all and embarassed."

Euille says he's glad McDonnell apologized for the omission.

"But his apology really should have been that 'I regret the fact that I even issued the declaration,'" he says.

Euille says the fact this declaration actually made it to McDonnell's desk is a sign the Governor's staff is inexperienced.

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