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WASHINGTON (AP) A school official says a BB gun in a student's car prompted a brief lockdown of three schools on the grounds of the Washington National Cathedral. Officials at St. Albans School say the school and the other schools were briefly put on lockdown this morning.

WASHINGTON (AP) Regular service has resumed on Metro's green and yellow lines after a woman was seriously injured after she was struck at Mount Vernon Square. Metro spokeswoman Taryn McNeil says witnesses report the woman intentionally placed herself on the tracks today. The station was closed nearly an hour while rescuers freed the woman from under the train.

WASHINGTON (AP) Prosecutors are asking a jury to convict a former nursing assistant of manslaughter in the death of an unruly patient who turned blue and started foaming at the mouth while he was being forcibly restrained at St. Elizabeths Hospital. Defense attorneys say Calvin Green used a reasonable amount of force.

WASHINGTON (AP) Call him Octavius the Octopus. That's the name the National Zoo chose Wednesday for its new giant Pacific octopus. More than 7,000 people voted on the name of the octopus, picking from four choices on a Web site the zoo set up.

(Copyright 2010 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

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