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Police Investigate ATM Skimmers

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By Meymo Lyons

If you've used the ATM at Congressional Plaza in Montgomery County recently, keep an eye on your bank account.

Rockville Police discovered a skimming device at the Wachovia Bank ATM in the 1600 block of Rockville Pike after an alert customer spotted it Saturday night.

The device works by reading all the account information stored electronically on the magnetic strip of your debit or credit card when you slide it into the machine.

Depending on the device’s sophistication, it also records your personal identification number, or PIN, as you punch it in on the ATM keypad.

The Alexandria Police Department continues to investigate the use of a skimmer on an ATM at the Wachovia on King Street. Several customers reported fraudulent charges on their bank cards with current losses estimated at over $60,000.

On Sunday, February 28, an ATM technician working on the machine found the skimming device. The engineer took photos of the device and went inside the bank to notify the bank’s security office. When he returned a few minutes later, the device had been removed.

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