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Delegate Holmes-Norton Going To Haiti

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By Elliott Francis

Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton is on her way to Haiti as part of congressional delegation.

The trip follows a recent pledge from U.S. government officials to contribute $1-billion over over two years to help rebuild the island nation. The delEgation includes Senator Mary Landrieu of louisiana, and Senator Kirsten Gillibrand of New York.

The schedule includes a visit to orphanages, where hundreds of children have been living since the Jan. 12th earthquake that killed more than 200,000 and left more than a million homeless.

The group will also meet with President Rene Preval to get an update on local rebuilding efforts, and an accounting for funds as the U.S. seeks to lead global fundraising efforts to help rebuild the country.

Norton chairs the subcommittee with jurisdiction over national emergencies here in the U.S. She recently held a congressional hearing to learn best-practices from U.S. emergency workers who assisted in earthquake rescue efforts in Haiti.

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