"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Monday, April 5, 2010 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Monday, April 5, 2010

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(April 5-May31) SACRED SCULPTURES The Sacred Made Real: Spanish Painting and Sculpture from the 17th century continues at The National Gallery of Art today through the end of May. The depictions of saints and icons from the Catholic canon are arrestingly real, and many are being presented in the U.S. for the first time.

(April 6-May 16) LEBANESE CONVERGENCE And for another first, you can drop by American University's Katzen Arts Center for the world premiere of Convergence: New Art from Lebanon tomorrow through mid-May. The works in this dynamic collection were produced in the aftermath of Lebanon's 15-year civil war and reflect the memories, hopes, and realities of a culture seeking to reclaim itself.

(April 6-May 23) THE LIAR April Fool's Day may have come and gone, but plenty of fibbers are planning their descent on the District for the Shakespeare Theatre Company's play The Liar, opening tomorrow. Pierre Corneille's farce follows the charming Dorante as he spins an impossible web of lies with his pants on fire.

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