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Local Victims Of Abuse By Clergy Speak Out

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The Archbishop of Washington Donald Wuerl listens to part of a vigil for those abused by clergy members before going across the street to St. Matthew’s Cathedral for Good Friday service.
Natalie Neumann
The Archbishop of Washington Donald Wuerl listens to part of a vigil for those abused by clergy members before going across the street to St. Matthew’s Cathedral for Good Friday service.

By Natalie Neumann

Some local victims of abuse by clergy members are using the Easter holiday to push the Catholic Church to do more to end abuse.

David Lorenz was sexually abused by a priest as a teen. He's still a practicing Catholic, but rather than attending a service at St. Matthew's Cathedral in Northwest D.C., he and a group of nearly 60 people gathered across the street at a service for victims of sexual abuse. Lorenz says events like this one help victims cope.

"When you see a group like this it makes us feel like we're not alone,'" he says.

"We pray for healing," says Archbishop of Washington Donald Wuerl. "We pray that every victim will sense that reconciliation with God and with God's church."

Lorenz says he was glad the Archbishop attended but wishes the Church would do more to prevent future abuse.

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