D.C. Receives $12 Million To Improve Lowest Performing Schools | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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D.C. Receives $12 Million To Improve Lowest Performing Schools

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By Kavitha Cardoza

D.C. Public Schools will recieve more than $12 million from the federal government to help improve their worst performing schools. Ten schools in D.C. have been identified as being what's called "persistently low achieving."

Sandra Abrevaya with the U.S. Department of Education says it's up to the District to choose a model they'll use to try to improve the schools. For example, the Restart Model involves converting a traditional school to a charter school, while the School Closure model suggests closing the school down and sending students elsewhere.

Abreyava says Locke High School in California sent just 5 percent of students to college before they used the Turnaround Model.

"You replace the principal, you screen existing school staff, and you improve the school through professional development, extended learning time and other strategies, the number of graduates increased by 43 percent," says Abreyava.

Schools will have site visits and will have to present periodic progress reports.

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