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Another Nationals Season Kicks Off, Crowds Hit Metro

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The Washington Nationals play today for the first time this year in an exhibition game against the Boston Red Sox, and Metro says fans taking the train should be prepared for a tight ride.

Along with the excitement of the new baseball season, Metro is reminding people that patience also needs to be part of game day as they make their way to and from the ballpark.

Metro will run extra trains on the green line for the exhibition match-up, but says it's still going to be a tight squeeze, and fans can expect standing room only on many trains.

After the game, metro transit police will be monitoring the crowds to ensure safety as fans move down the escalators onto full platforms. And of course, taking the bus is another way to get around.

The Nationals' regular season opener will be Monday, when President Obama is scheduled to throw out the ceremonial first pitch. Ballpark gates will open at 10 a.m. on opening day for a 1 p.m. start time as the Nationals host the Philadelphia Phillies.

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