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Washington D.C. And The 2010 Census

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By Stephanie Kaye

Today is April Fool's Day, but it's also National Census Day. A rally to spread the word about the Census in D.C. began this morning at an iconic diner off the U Street Corridor.

U.S. Census Director Robert Groves says this year's census is the shortest it's been since the first country-wide count in 1790.

"A friend of mine called me the other night and said, 'You lie, Census Bureau! It doesn't take ten minutes. It only took me three minutes!' So I apologize for that misinformation. It's really short," says Groves.

Groves says the status of students and ex-pats sometimes proves confusing to people trying to complete their forms. Students should consider their college or university their residence. As for the many ex-pats in Washington.

"People who are new to the country, people who are not citizens, sometimes believe they actually shouldn't be part of the census. This is wrong," he says.

Census workers will be sent out in two weeks to follow-up on any forms that are not returned, or are sent in but are incomplete.

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