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Fenty Releases Budget Plan

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The Wilson Building, Washington D.C.
Patrick Madden
The Wilson Building, Washington D.C.

By Patrick Madden

D.C. Mayor Adrian Fenty's budget plan for next year is out, and he's promising to fill a half-billion dollar budget hole, give more money to schools, and do it without raising taxes.

On one hand there are no "general" tax increases: property, income, and sales taxes remain unchanged. But the budget plan does include a whole host of ways to raise money: parking meters are up a quarter in some places; increased traffic fines; a one percent fee on hospital services; All told, there are at least a dozen fee increases in the blueprint. Fenty also wants to cut 375 government jobs. About half are vacant positions.

"People challenge us all the time to make sure we remove the fat, remove the waste from government. This is one very clear example of where we are doing that," says Fenty.

The spending plan is now in the hands of the D.C. Council. The council has less than two months to make changes and vote out a balanced budget.

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