Medical Marijuana Advocates Say D.C. Pot Bill Is Too Restrictive | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Medical Marijuana Advocates Say D.C. Pot Bill Is Too Restrictive

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By Patrick Madden

As a bill to legalize medical marijuana in D.C. makes its way through the city council, some advocates say the proposal is too restrictive.

Medical Marijuana advocate Scott Morgan points to several parts of the bill. For example, the legislation says patients must 'medicate' at their home. Morgan suffers from migraine headaches, which he says can strike at any point, and make driving impossible.

"I actually experience blindness at the onset of an attack - so legally if I am expected to get to my own home before I can medicate, that's hugely problematic," says Morgan.

Morgan says he's also disappointed the bill does not allow patients to grow their own plants.

"This is a very tight bill. We've looked at other states but, for instance, with home cultivation we are more restrictive than other states," says D.C. Council member Phil Mendelson.

Mendelson says the bill is restrictive, because, as he puts it, the law is about medical marijuana and not just about recreational use. And, unlike other states, the law must survive congressional review.

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