"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Wednesday, March 31, 2010 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Wednesday, March 31, 2010

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(March 31) THE ART OF GAMAN The Renwick Gallery in Northwest D.C. exhibits the arts and crafts of interned Japanese-Americans during World War II in The Art of Gaman through January 2011. Guest lecturer Karen Matsuoka arrives at the gallery today at noon to share her insights as the daughter of an internee in commemoration of the 10th anniversary of the National Japanese American Memorial.

(March 31) MAN VS. FAN And oriental arts are combined by Kaishi Katsura at the The Kennedy Center's free Millennium Stage show tonight at 6 p.m. Katsura brings the Rakugo comedic tradition to D.C., performing an entire cast of Japanese characters while crouched on a cushion, using only a delicate fan and witty repartee.

(March 31-April 18) IN DARFUR The unconscionable costs of war are examined in the show In Darfur playing tonight through April 18th at Theater J in Northwest D.C. Playwright Winter Miller traveled to Sudan to interview genocide survivors, basing this searing story on the struggles she witnessed.

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The Revival Of Lamb Ham: A Colonial Tradition Renewed

British colonialists brought lamb ham to America, where a sugar-cured, smoked variety became popular. Easier-to-cure pork ham eventually took its place, but now two Virginians are bringing it back.
NPR

The Revival Of Lamb Ham: A Colonial Tradition Renewed

British colonialists brought lamb ham to America, where a sugar-cured, smoked variety became popular. Easier-to-cure pork ham eventually took its place, but now two Virginians are bringing it back.
WAMU 88.5

Hogan Getting His Way On Tax Cuts, Though Still Needs House To Go Along

Tax cut measures promoted by Maryland's Republican governor have made their way through the Senate, but now they need to get past Democrats in the House of Delegates.
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If Drones Make You Nervous, Think Of Them As Flying Donkeys

In Africa, where there aren't always roads from Point A to Point B, drones could take critical medicines to remote spots. But the airborne vehicles make people uneasy for lots of reasons.

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