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D.C. Medical Marijuana Bill Moves Forward

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The D.C. medical marijuana bill is still working its way through the council and could be voted on by late April.
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The D.C. medical marijuana bill is still working its way through the council and could be voted on by late April.

By Patrick Madden

Medical marijuana is now one step closer to becoming legal in D.C. The bill was approved by two city council committees this morning and will head to the full council for a vote this spring.

Here are the basics of the bill: Authorized patients will be able to receive ... at most ... two ounces of marijuana per month, according to one advocate at today's council hearing; that's about one joint a day.

Patients will not be allowed to grow their own plants. They'll have to pick it up at one of the city's five medical marijuana dispensaries.

D.C. Council Member Phil Mendelson explains which patients would qualify under the bill.

"People who have chronic conditions, severe pain, people who have difficulty with wanting to eat or being able to eat, and people with glaucoma," says Mendelson.

Other key points: Patients will have to use the marijuana at their home or their hospital, and doctors will be audited if they hand out a certain number of prescriptions.

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