: News

Filed Under:

Protesters At Georgetown University Chain Selves To Statue

Play associated audio
Three Georgetown students have chained themselves to a statue of the school's founder, Bishop John Carroll. They are protesting the school's policies towards reproductive rights.
David Schultz
Three Georgetown students have chained themselves to a statue of the school's founder, Bishop John Carroll. They are protesting the school's policies towards reproductive rights.

By David Schultz

The students have three demands: they want access to contraception on campus, comprehensive sex education, and they want the university to formally recognize their abortion-rights group, Hoyas for Choice.

Campus police officers are on the scene because the statue is outside the school's "designated free speech" area. Police officers say their strategy is to wait the students out. But Erica Slates, a Georgetown senior who's acting as their spokesperson, says that could take a while.

"I do know the students who are chained and I know that they are incredibly committed people," she says. "So I'm not sure that's going to work out."

In a letter sent earlier this week, school administrators said they won't recognize Hoyas For Choice because the group does not conform to "Catholic and Jesuit traditions."

NPR

Yaya Alafia's Songs Of Strength For Her Baby Boy

2013 was a big year for actress and model Yaya Alafia. She starred in three films and had a baby boy. Alafia shares the songs reflecting those experiences for Tell Me More's series 'In Your Ear.'
NPR

Fast-Food CEOs Earn Supersize Salaries; Workers Earn Small Potatoes

A new report finds that the average compensation of fast-food CEOs has quadrupled since 2000. By comparison, worker wages have increased less than 1 percent.
NPR

Kansas Residents To First Lady: Stay Out

Guest restrictions and increased security measures are looming as Michelle Obama plans to appear at a Kansas high school graduation next month. Thousands have petitioned to revoke her invitation.
NPR

The Price War Over The Cloud Has High Stakes For The Internet

Amazon, Google, Microsoft and others are competing to be the main landlords of the cloud. Their terms and prices could control who gets to build what on the Internet, and for how much.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.