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Protesters At Georgetown University Chain Selves To Statue

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Three Georgetown students have chained themselves to a statue of the school's founder, Bishop John Carroll. They are protesting the school's policies towards reproductive rights.
David Schultz
Three Georgetown students have chained themselves to a statue of the school's founder, Bishop John Carroll. They are protesting the school's policies towards reproductive rights.

By David Schultz

The students have three demands: they want access to contraception on campus, comprehensive sex education, and they want the university to formally recognize their abortion-rights group, Hoyas for Choice.

Campus police officers are on the scene because the statue is outside the school's "designated free speech" area. Police officers say their strategy is to wait the students out. But Erica Slates, a Georgetown senior who's acting as their spokesperson, says that could take a while.

"I do know the students who are chained and I know that they are incredibly committed people," she says. "So I'm not sure that's going to work out."

In a letter sent earlier this week, school administrators said they won't recognize Hoyas For Choice because the group does not conform to "Catholic and Jesuit traditions."

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