: News

Filed Under:

Protesters At Georgetown University Chain Selves To Statue

Play associated audio
Three Georgetown students have chained themselves to a statue of the school's founder, Bishop John Carroll. They are protesting the school's policies towards reproductive rights.
David Schultz
Three Georgetown students have chained themselves to a statue of the school's founder, Bishop John Carroll. They are protesting the school's policies towards reproductive rights.

By David Schultz

The students have three demands: they want access to contraception on campus, comprehensive sex education, and they want the university to formally recognize their abortion-rights group, Hoyas for Choice.

Campus police officers are on the scene because the statue is outside the school's "designated free speech" area. Police officers say their strategy is to wait the students out. But Erica Slates, a Georgetown senior who's acting as their spokesperson, says that could take a while.

"I do know the students who are chained and I know that they are incredibly committed people," she says. "So I'm not sure that's going to work out."

In a letter sent earlier this week, school administrators said they won't recognize Hoyas For Choice because the group does not conform to "Catholic and Jesuit traditions."

NPR

Cult Survivor Documents 2 Decades Inside 'Holy Hell'

Will Allen directed the documentary Holy Hell, which depicts his experience as a videographer and member of The Buddhafield cult. Allen used his own footage, as well as his interviews with other former members, to make this documentary.
NPR

Evaporated Cane Juice? Puh-leeze. Just Call It Sugar, FDA Says

Companies cultivating a healthful image often list "evaporated cane juice" in their products' ingredients. But the FDA says it's really just sugar, and that's what food labels should call it.
WAMU 88.5

The Politics Hour - May 27, 2016

Congress votes to override DC's 2013 ballot initiative on budget autonomy. Virginia governor faces a federal investigation over international finance and lobbying rules. And DC, Maryland and Virginia move to create a Metro safety oversight panel.

NPR

After Departure Of Uber, Lyft In Austin, New Companies Enter The Void

Earlier this month, voters in Austin, Texas, rejected an effort to overturn the city's rules for ride-hailing companies. Uber and Lyft tried to prevent fingerprinting of their drivers, and now both have left town. A few other ride-share companies have popped up to help fill the void. NPR explores how people are getting around town without Uber and Lyft.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.