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Secret Women's Shelter Expanding In D.C.

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My Sister's Place Executive Director Lauren Vaughan and D.C. At-Large Council Member Kwame Brown help break ground for MSP's new renovations.
Rebecca Sheir
My Sister's Place Executive Director Lauren Vaughan and D.C. At-Large Council Member Kwame Brown help break ground for MSP's new renovations.

By Rebecca Sheir

This fall, more women trying to escape domestic violence in D.C., could have a safe place to go. The District's only confidential shelter for battered women is expanding, to keep more families away from abuse and off the streets.

Renovations are underway at an undisclosed location in D.C., where My Sisters Place is more than doubling its capacity, to 45 emergency shelter beds.

Lauren Vaughan, acting executive director of MSP, says the new facility will have a playground, computer room and a commercial kitchen with a full-time chef.

But she cant give too much detail: confidentiality has been key since My Sisters Place opened in 1979. Hence the name.

"When you're gonna go to a secret location, you don't wanna say, I'm going to a secret shelter," says Vaughan. "You know, I'm going to my sisters place. And it just became a code that stuck."

Vaughan says she expects construction to wind up this fall just in time for residents to enjoy a peaceful, and professionally-cooked, Thanksgiving meal.

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