Juvenile Treatment Facility In Rockville Lose State Support | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Juvenile Treatment Facility In Rockville Lose State Support

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By Natalie Neumann

A long-time juvenile treatment facility in Rockville, Maryland no longer has the state's support. The State's Department of Juvenile Services says it will no longer make referrals there. Neighbors have had growing concern about the facility.

The older white house sits atop a hill overlooking a walking path in Wootton Hills Park. It's home to the Karma Academy for Boys and has been there since 1972. But in the past year there have been reports of teens leaving the facility without permission and of a sexual assault involving juveniles living there.

A neighbor to the facility, who wishes to remain anonymous, says his children are intimidated to walk by when the residents are outside.

"We'll say 'why is that?' and it's like 'you never know with the...' and they point towards the house," he says.

He says he hopes the academy can serve juveniles in a different location.

Ron Rivlin, manager of the Juvenile Justice Service in Montgomery County, says it's unfortunate the program will be closing.

"It's has served many kids and really helped a lot of kids and families over the years," he says.

Rivlin says the teenagers will be placed in other state programs.

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