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City Leaders Troubled By New HIV Report

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By Patrick Madden

City leaders in Washington say they are concerned by a new study on the HIV risks for gay men. The study finds that older men who have sex with men were more likely to not use protection or have multiple partners than their younger counterparts. Health officials say this is despite the fact that many of the older men had better health care and more education. They also had lived through the AIDS epidemic of the 1980s and early 90s.

D.C. Councilman David Catania calls the findings startling and a wake up call for many in his age group.

"We are here because we escaped the epidemic, but we are still here. And just because we escaped the epidemic in the 80s and 90s doesn't mean we are immune," says Catania.

500 men were tested for the study. 14 percent or one in seven tested HIV positive.

Another surprising finding in the report: many of those who found out they were HIV positive through the study had seen a doctor in the past year but were not tested.

Catania says he will talk to the Medical Board to see what can be done to persuade doctors to offer more HIV tests.

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