: News

Truancy Court In Montgomery County

Play associated audio

By Matt Bush

Two schools in Montgomery County have implemented a program that tries to get truant students into school consistently.

Key Middle School in Silver Spring is one of the schools with a Truancy Court. Habitually truant students meet with a volunteer judge to determine why they're not in school.

Principal Dr. Eric Minus says one of the biggest reasons for truancy is many children have to wake up on their own.

"Parents may have different work situations or work hours that may cause them to get out of the house earlier. We want to make sure kids and parents are educated about what is appropriate in terms of making sure their children get to school. And motivating and encouraging the kid about how important it is to get themselves up, even if it's as simple as getting them an alarm clock," says Minus.

The court is voluntary, and Minus says making it mandatory wouldn't work.

"We framed it in a way that it's not punitive for kids. It's not looking at taking them away from the school," he says.

A federal grant will fund the court, which was modeled after a similar program in Baltimore.


'We All Have To Do Something': Nina Jacobson On Diversifying Hollywood

No one knows the struggles and successes of women in Hollywood better than Nina Jacobson, the producer of the Hunger Games movies. NPR catches up with one of the most powerful women in the business.

Fine Brine From Appalachia: The Fancy Mountain Salt That Chefs Prize

An artisanal salt producer is processing brine from ancient ocean deposits below West Virgina's mountains. The company, J.Q. Dickinson Salt Works, ships to top chefs who value the salt's minerality.

Downed Russian Warplane Highlights Regional Divide On Syria

Hugh Pope, director of communications and outreach at the International Crisis Group in Brussels, explains the growing divide between Turkey and Russia on their priorities inside Syria.

From Takeout To Breakups: Apps Can Deliver Anything, For A Price

Convenience is at an all-time premium — and a lot of smartphone apps promise to make many of the things we do every day easier. In a time-crunch or sheer laziness, how far will the apps take us?

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.