: News

British Technology Could Speed Metro's Emergency Response

Play associated audio
Metro finally abandoned its three-year battle against the transit workers union yesterday, agreeing to a wage increase and almost $100 million in back wages and pension payments.
Rebecca Sheir
Metro finally abandoned its three-year battle against the transit workers union yesterday, agreeing to a wage increase and almost $100 million in back wages and pension payments.

By Rebecca Sheir

Metro is importing technology from Great Britain to speed up emergency response times. First responders say new battery-powered vehicles could have been invaluable after last June's fatal crash on the Red Line.

It takes firefighters from Arlington, Virginia less than two minutes to assemble a Mobile Emergency Response Vehicle, or MERV. Chief Jim Daugherty of the Arlington County Fire Department says Metro is storing 26 un-assembled units throughout its rail system.

"So they're gonna have to take em out, you know, piece by piece and put them together on the track bed," says Daugherty. "And then get them down the track."

The London Fire Brigade used MERVs after the 2005 bombings in the Underground. Bill Whetzel of the D.C. Fire Department says his rescue squad used manual push-carts after last June's Red Line crash.

"I could have loaded a lot more equipment on this cart here," says Whetzel, "and bring victims out."

Since MERVs can run up to 12 miles an hour, they can turn what could be a 45-minute walk into a four-minute ride.

WAMU 88.5

What The African American History Museum Means to D.C.'s Black Community

This weekend, D.C. celebrated the opening of the National Museum of African American History and Culture. Kojo chats with the civil rights leader and longtime city council member who chaired the D.C. host committee.

NPR

Sunday Sports: Baseball Season Stats

As the baseball season enters the homestretch, Mike Pesca, host of The Gist podcast shares obscure baseball stats and somewhat dubious accomplishments with NPR's Rachel Martin.
NPR

Politics In The News: First Presidential Debate

The first presidential debate at Hofstra University is just hours away. David Greene talks to columnist and commentator Cokie Roberts and National Review senior editor Jonah Goldberg for a preview.
WAMU 88.5

Putting The Patient At The Center Of Local Healthcare

From "concierge" services to iPads connecting new parents with their babies in the nursery, Kojo explores some of the patient-centered ideas coming from healthcare innovation labs at local hospitals.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.