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"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Thursday, March 25, 2010

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ANIMAR-TE at American University.
Laboratorio LADAT (Laboratorio de animacion y technologias audiovisuals)
ANIMAR-TE at American University.

(March 25-May 1) PANDA-MATION If you miss Tai Shan, our native-born bear now living in China, you can get your fix with a panda of another stripe at American University's Katzen Arts Center. Running through May 1st, Kung Fu Panda and a menagerie of other computer-animated characters come to life during the exhibit ANIMAR-TE featuring original drawings and movable models used in cartoon movies.

(March 25) JOSEPH ARTHUR You can have a bear of a time in Vienna, Virginia tonight with singer-songwriter Joseph Arthur tonight at 8 p.m. The Akron, Ohio native brings a decade's worth of intricately produced atmospheric-pop to Jammin' Java along one of Vienna's main drags, Maple Avenue East.

(March 26) KING OF BASS And the Montpelier Arts Center gets the regal treatment tomorrow night at 8 p.m. from the James King Quartet. The contrabass-man brings panache, versatility and friends to the familiar venue in Riverdale for a jazzed-up Friday night.


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Internet Food Culture Gives Rise To New 'Eatymology'

Internet food culture has brought us new words for nearly every gastronomical condition. The author of "Eatymology," parodist Josh Friedland, discusses "brogurt" with NPR's Rachel Martin.

Proposed Climate Change Rules At Odds With U.S. Opponents

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What Is Li-Fi And When Will You Use It To Download Everything Faster?

Li-Fi is a lot like Wi-Fi, but it uses light to transmit data. NPR's Scott Simon speaks to the man who invented the faster alternative: Harald Haas.

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