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A New Strategy For Getting Veterans Jobs

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Unemployed veteran Tonia White says a lot of veterans have a hard time finding out where to get help when they need it.
Jonathan Wilson
Unemployed veteran Tonia White says a lot of veterans have a hard time finding out where to get help when they need it.

By Jonathan Wilson

The U.S. Department of Labor is trying some new strategies to fight the 20 percent unemployment rate for veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan. One strategy is making its national debut in Washington.

Today the Department of Labor is holding what its calling a jobs summit for female veterans, at the Boys and Girls Club of Greater Washington on Benning Road. Organizers say its more than just a job fair because the employers here were matched up with the veterans who registered and their particular skill sets.

But Tonia White says the biggest challenge for veterans like her is finding out when help like this is available.

"This room should be filled, and I have a feeling not a lot of people know about this, and its kind of unfortunate," she says.

Seventy-five women registered for the event -- and the Department of Labor says the summit will be duplicated around the country if more than half the women here find jobs.

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