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EPA Tells Government (And Everyone Else) How To Curb Runoff

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By Sabri Ben-Achour

The Environmental Protection Agency is releasing guidelines to help the federal government cut water pollution from lands it owns in the Chesapeake Bay watershed.

The government owns eight percent of the land that drains into the Chesapeake Bay. In an Executive Order last year, President Obama directed the Federal Government to strengthen control on runoff there.

Charles Fox is special advisor for the Chesapeake to the EPA Administrator. He says the guidelines represent the most advanced scientific thinking on runoff control, and can serve as a template for everyone else too.

"This document outlines a series of practices that homeowners can take for example to reduce fertilization of their turf grass, there's also a series of innovative ideas to reduce pollution from agricultural activities," says Fox.

Beth McGee is with the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, she says the guidelines fall a bit short of what she expected.

"We need more than guidance, we need actions, measurable commitments to do things that we can judge what the government is or not achieving," says McGee.

McGee says her group will be watching to see whether the government follows through.

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