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Maryland Woman Gets Life for Killing, Freezing 2 Girls

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ROCKVILLE, Md. (AP) A Maryland woman convicted of killing two of her adopted daughters and storing their bodies in a home freezer offered no hint of what drove her to torture them, as she was sentenced Monday to two consecutive life terms, plus 75 years in prison.

Renee Bowman, 44, maintained the inscrutable exterior that she displayed during the trial last month, showing no emotion even as she apologized.

“I am very sorry for the abuse of the girls,” she told Montgomery County Circuit Judge Michael J. Algeo in an even voice. “It haunts me. It haunts me every day.”

The judge was unconvinced.

“You come across as such a nice, soft-spoken person,”Algeo said. “I can only conclude that the Renee Bowman I see before me is a different Renee Bowman from the one who lived in that house in Lusby.”

It was in that southern Maryland community that the bodies of Minnet and Jasmine Bowman were discovered in a locked freezer in September 2008. Authorities searched the home after a third sister escaped from the house and was found wandering the neighborhood.

Investigators concluded Bowman had killed the girls months before, while the family was living in Rockville, and took the freezer with her as she moved around. Even after the girls were dead, she continued to collect subsidies paid to adoptive parents of special-needs children.

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