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Local Group Promotes World Water Day

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Nearly 900 million people worldwide can't access clean water.
Rebecca Sheir
Nearly 900 million people worldwide can't access clean water.

By Rebecca Sheir

It's been 18 years since the United Nations declared March 22nd World Water Day.A local advocacy group is trying to raise awareness about the importance of safe drinking water every day.

For many of us, drinking a glass of clean water isn't a big deal.

We open up a tap and take it for granted that the water is gonna come out, says Cynthia Hartley, who chairs the D.C. branch of Water For People, a nonprofit advocating for clean water around the world. But in developing countries, it's a different story.

"They have to walk six, seven kilometers just to get water from a dirty well or a river source that's polluted because people are washing their clothes upstream," says Hartley, "or animals are wading in that water source."

Hartley says in this region, with resources such as the Chesapeake Bay, she hopes people appreciate the significance of clean water. Especially in a world where nearly 900-million people cant access clean water, and nearly 6,000 die from water-related illnesses, every day.

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