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Democrats Readying for Vote Backlash

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By Peter Granitz

Now that President Barack Obama is poised to sign health care legislation into law, area Democrats are trying to convince voters they’ll see immediate results.

Republicans have maintained for the better of a year if the bill passes, Democrats will fair poorly in November’s midterm elections.

But Democrats from Maryland and Virginia are buffeting those claims … saying people will see changes in the system within the first six months. Still, the majority of the changes won’t be phased in for years.

Mandates to buy health coverage and the fines associated with them won’t kick in until 2014.

Still, Representative Chris Van Hollen says people will notice some key differences right away.

“For example insurance companies will be prohibited from denying children coverage based on pre-existing conditions. Senior citizens are going to get a little more help paying for the pharmaceuticals that they need.”

Virginia Democrat Gerry Connolly adds that a major group of uninsured people could gain access … before November.

“Well if you’ve got a young person graduating from college who doesn’t have health insurance, we’re going to be able to - immediately, day one - extend their coverage to the age of 26.”

The president is expected to sign the bill Tuesday … the same day the Senate could vote on a package of fixes to the bill.

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