After Healthcare, Immigration Might Be Next | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

After Healthcare, Immigration Might Be Next

Play associated audio

By Sabri Ben-Achour

Even before the dust could settle from Congress' vote on Healthcare reform, thousands rallied on the National Mall to make Immigration reform the next item on the national agenda.

Organizers estimate 200,000 thousand people assembled on the Mall Sunday for immigration reform. Among them was Alejandra Cruz from Cullmore Virginia.

"We hope that Obama Obama listens, we voted for him so he needs to vote for Immigration reform!"

President Obama did appear to be listening. In a video address to the crowd he pledged to fixing what he called our "broken Immigration system." Last week, he praised a bipartisan reform plan proposed by Democratic Senator Chuck Shumer and Republican Senator Lyndsey Graham. It would tighten border security and work laws while expanding visa opportunities for immigrants both highly skilled and low-skilled. It also offers a path, though not an easy one, to legalization for undocumented immigrants. Mr. Obama says he wants to move on immigration reform this year.

NPR

The Technology Of Books Has Changed, But Bookstores Are Hanging In

The debate over whether digital books are better continues. But in the age of Amazon, the number of independent booksellers is up. The revival is fueled, at least in part, by digital natives.
NPR

Bugs: Not What's For Dinner — Until They're Tastier, Maybe

A U.K. researcher says the environmental argument for eating bugs isn't working on its own. She says chefs and policymakers must "make insect dishes appeal as food, not just a way to save the planet."
NPR

Nebraska Lawmakers Override Veto; Abolish Death Penalty

Nebraska's governor had tried to veto a bill repealing the death penalty but the one-house legislature overrode the veto. Nebraska has executed only three prisoners since the 1950s, the last in 1997.
NPR

The Technology Of Books Has Changed, But Bookstores Are Hanging In

The debate over whether digital books are better continues. But in the age of Amazon, the number of independent booksellers is up. The revival is fueled, at least in part, by digital natives.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.