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Alzheimer's, Aging and Elementary Schools

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Experience Corps volunteer Jessie Wells.
Stephanie Kaye
Experience Corps volunteer Jessie Wells.

A study of local tutors and the way their brains work could change the way we think of retirement. Scientists at Johns Hopkins University are examining the function of older adults who are tutoring through a group called Experience Corps.

Dr. Michelle Carlson says these active, community minded volunteers do better on cognitive tests than their non-tutoring counterparts. "What was exciting about this opportunity is to think about how Experience Corps can appeal to the positive aspects of retirement and aging. We need to evaluate and perhaps re-evaluate what retirement means to different individuals."

Carlson says the active lifestyle that tutoring promotes may help ward off dementia and Alzheimer's Disease, by stimulating activity in the frontal lobe. The study is being expanded, studying a larger group of volunteers for the next two years.

Stephanie Kaye reports...


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