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People Line Up For President Obama's Rally In Virginia

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By Kavitha Cardoza

Outside the Patriot Center at the George Mason University, hundreds of people have lined up to support and oppose President Obama’s final rally for healthcare reform.

Many of the people here support President Obama's healthcare reform initiative. One woman on crutches says she only realized how important it was when she was in a recent accident. Another man said he was laid off two months ago and couldn’t afford health insurance anymore. And one student Sophia Linlay says her family is behind the president 100 percent.

"My mom’s a nurse and my dad’s a doctor so I kind of go with them," says Linlay.

But there are protesters here as well. Ann Gerner is holding up a sign which reads "Obamacare will kill us." She says the proposal is "atrocious."

"Insurance premiums will go through the roof, private insurance companies will go out of business and the quality of care is going to decline," says Gerner.

The President is expected to speak here at 11:30.


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