: News

Filed Under:

Group Led By Justice's Wife Cited For Fundraising Violation

Play associated audio

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) A Virginia-based conservative advocacy group led by the wife of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas has been raising money without first registering with state regulators as required by law, according to consumer protection officials.

The state Office of Consumer Affairs sent a letter Thursday to Virginia Thomas, president of Liberty Central Inc., informing her of the violation. J. Michael Wright, the office's manager of regulatory programs, said the group's lawyer told him Friday that the filing would be sent that day.

Liberty Central was founded in November but did not become active until last month, said Amy Feather, director of business development and marketing.

Wright said it is not unusual for new organizations to be unaware of the registration requirement, but Liberty Central said in a written statement that it was waiting for a letter from the Internal Revenue Service establishing its nonprofit status before beginning the state registration process. The group said it received the IRS letter Thursday.

In its letter to Thomas, the consumer affairs office said failure to register before soliciting contributions in Virginia is punishable by fines of up to $5,000 for each violation. However, Wright said it is customary for the office to work with organizations to get them to comply rather than seek sanctions.

NPR

Texas Bookseller Picks 3 Summer Reads

Julia Green of Front Street Books recommends Moonlight on Linoleum by Terry Helwig, City of Women by David R. Gillham and The Evolution of Calpurnia Tate by Jacqueline Kelly.
NPR

He Used To Live On The Streets Of Mumbai. Now, His Cafe Welcomes Everyone

Amin Sheikh's new cafe is a rarity in class-stratified India: It's open to people from all walks of life. Sheikh is a former street child, and so are many of his employees.
NPR

For Many Black Voters, Trump's 'What Do You Have To Lose?' Plea Isn't Enough

Donald Trump promises to help bring jobs and security to black neighborhoods. But his poll numbers with African-Americans are in the low single digits, and many say his message is insulting.
NPR

WATCH: Squishy 'Octobot' Moves Autonomously

The robot designed by a team from Harvard University moves without the help of any rigid parts. Researchers say it is the first proof-of-concept design for an entirely soft, autonomous machine.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.