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"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Weekend Events, March 19-21, 2010

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An early "danzon" group, circa 1908.
An early "danzon" group, circa 1908.

(March 19) LUNA NEGRA Cuban dance, culture, and composition coalesce in Danzon at the Music Center at Strathmore in North Bethesda tonight at 8. The alchemy of Cuban composer Paquito D'Rivera, the Turtle Island Quartet and the Luna Negra Dance Theatre bring their innovative jazz moves and sounds to this multi-sensory experience.

(March 20-June 13) THE ISLAMIC MANUSCRIPT PROJECT The Walters Art Museum opens its exhibit of Islamic manuscripts this weekend through June in Baltimore. Poetry and Prayer showcases masterpieces produced from the ninth to the nineteenth century, covering a range of subjects from the devotional to the scientific, historic and poetic.

(March 21) CAPITAL CITY SYMPHONY Classical and jazz music combine this weekend at the Atlas Performing Arts Center in northeast DC for Symphony Lounge Sunday evening at 5. The Capital City Symphony presents Charlie Barnett and his band Chaise Lounge in a special collaboration of beguiling orchestral arrangements of high-brow and low-down tunes.


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