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Teens Driving Less In D.C. Region

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By Matt Bush

As the use of social media tools such as Facebook and text messages is rising, the number of teens driving is dropping.

An analysis by the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments shows those age 16 to 24 in the D.C. region took fewer trips per day in 2008 than in 1994. The biggest drop was in social or recreational trips says Robert Griffiths, COG's Technical Services Director.

"Almost by one half. So rather than traveling and seeing their friends. It's social networking, facebook, it's texting. It's virtually getting together with your friends," says Griffiths.

Griffiths adds one area that saw an increase among that age group was transportation to school.

"One of the comments on the Millenial Generation is it's probably our best educated generation, but least employed, at least at this point in their career. With the state the economy is in, it's good to stay in school a little bit longer," she says.

The same analysis showed those 65 and older now took close to 20 percent more trips than they did in 1994.

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