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Firings And Discipline After Teacher Death

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By Sabri Ben-Achour

Maryland's Juvenile Services secretary says two employees have been fired and three disciplined after a teacher was killed at a state-run juvenile detention center in Prince George's County.

The Cheltenham Youth Facility is a place where children awaiting trial are held before their court date. It also houses a shelter for children under court supervision who are not considered dangerous.

Sixty-Five-year-old Hannah Wheeling was a teacher there, and her body was found outside a building at the facility on February 18th. Police say she was murdered. They haven't charged anyone, though they are focusing their investigation on a 13-year-old-boy housed at the shelter.

Juvenile Services Secretary Donald DeVore says one of the youth in the program has been transferred and admissions to the program have been suspended. Two staff members have been fired, a high-level administrator has been demoted, and a supervisor and program manager have been suspended.

DeVore says the investigation found that some youth in program weren't being supervised as Cheltenham policies require.


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