D.C. Anti-Gang Coalition Sponsors Workshop | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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D.C. Anti-Gang Coalition Sponsors Workshop

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By Elliott Francis

An organization that has brokered six truce settlements between gangs in D.C. is taking on a new challenge. The Alliance of Concerned Men is focusing attention on helping case workers who work with gang members.

Members representing six community based organizations are here on the 4th floor of the Columbia Heights Youth Club. They are searching for answers to questions raised by the chronic problem of gang violence.

Much of the focus is on helping the case workers, so they can help others, says Alliance president Rico Rush.

"...We need some healing in our community, not only with the folks who are suffering but we need it for the care providers, the care givers, because with this kind of work you can get burned out," he says.

The workshop was the group's first focusing on case workers. Discussing methods and offering suggestions to difficult issues that come up working with gangs. The alliance plans to hold a rally in Columbia Heights this month to promote funding for community outreach.

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