: News

Home Rescue Fair Targets Latinos Facing Foreclosure

Play associated audio

By Rebecca Sheir

A report from a Latino advocacy group in D.C. and the University of North Carolina suggests more than one-million Latino families will lose their homes to foreclosure from 2009 through 2012. The organizers of a "home rescue fair" in Prince William County, Virginia, are hoping to reduce that number locally.

The National Council of La Raza co-authored the report and co-organized the fair, which will feature free sessions with loan specialists, attorneys and housing counselors, to assist people facing foreclosure.

The fair is open to anyone in the D.C. area, and will include interpreters to assist Spanish speakers. NCLR's legislative analyst, Graciela Aponte, says she expects a large Latino contingent.

"They still believe in the American dream to have this home, to have their own home," says Aponte. "And there is a lot of responsibility with being a home owner, but it's a lot of freedom, and a lot of people are proud they are actually home owners."

NCLR is partnering with several other organizations to hold 40 home rescue fairs across the country. The next one in Virginia is scheduled for August.

Today's fair begins at 4 p.m. at the Boys and Girls Club of Greater Washington in Manassas, Virginia.

NPR

QUIZ: How Much Do You Know About Presidents And Food?

It's week two of the party conventions, and all these speeches are making us hungry. So we made a quiz to test your savvy about presidents and our favorite topic, food.
NPR

QUIZ: How Much Do You Know About Presidents And Food?

It's week two of the party conventions, and all these speeches are making us hungry. So we made a quiz to test your savvy about presidents and our favorite topic, food.
NPR

QUIZ: How Much Do You Know About Presidents And Food?

It's week two of the party conventions, and all these speeches are making us hungry. So we made a quiz to test your savvy about presidents and our favorite topic, food.
WAMU 88.5

How To Help Teens And Children Fight 'Tech Addiction'

Many parents and therapists say obsessive internet use is a very real problem for some teens and children. But the term “internet addiction” is controversial and not officially recognized as a disorder. How to help kids who compulsively use computers and mobile technology.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.