"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Monday, March 15, 2010 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Monday, March 15, 2010

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(March 12-May 22) LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS With spring on the way, a carnivorous creeper can be found in full bloom at Ford's Theatre in downtown D.C. The popular rock musical Little Shop of Horrors puts its roots down through May 22nd, telling the story of a well-intentioned flower shop clerk and his wisecracking carnivorous plant.

(March 15-April 11) CLYBOURNE PARK Wooly Mammoth Theatre Company opens the play Clybourne Park tonight through April 11th in Northwest D.C. The thrills and ills of urban living are presented in this hilarious yet horrifying look at race and gentrification, focusing in on the Chicago of the 1950s and present day.

(March 16-28) Environmental Film Festival You can celebrate spring by going green at the D.C. Environmental Film Festival, kicking off tomorrow in the District. The ecologically sensitive celluloid is presented in 155 films at 56 venues throughout D.C., exploring the wonders of the natural world while illuminating the growing challenges to life on earth.

NPR

Snubs And Successes: 6 Lessons Learned From This Year's Emmy Nominations

HBO's Game of Thrones emerged as the most-nominated series with 19 nods for the Primetime Emmy Awards, but new series such as FX's Fargo and HBO's True Detective scored, too.
NPR

'Captain Pizza' Saves The Day, But Doesn't Save Himself A Slice

A pilot found himself hungry during a midflight delay. But instead of just buying a pizza for himself, he bought 50 pizzas for the entire Frontier Airlines plane.
NPR

Study: Statehouse Press Corps In Decline

A Pew report found that the number of full-time newspaper reporters covering state politics fell dramatically in the past decade, raising questions about their ability to closely monitor politicians.
NPR

A New Device Lets You Track Your Preschooler ... And Listen In

LG's KizON wristband lets you keep tabs on your child. But some experts say such devices send the wrong message about the world we live in. And the gadgets raise questions about kids' privacy rights.

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