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Looking For Short Order - Not Short Stop - At Nationals Park

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By Ginger Moored

Spring training begins this weekend at Washington Nationals ballpark. But the players won't be swinging any bats.

About 1,500 people tried out for positions at the park two weeks ago. This weekend more than 200 of them will dress for training. But their manager, Terry Louzon, says he is not looking for a star short stop. He wants people with different skills. He lists them as, "grill cooks, prep cooks, servers, dishwashers."

Louzon is the executive chef of Levy Restuarants, which runs the stadium’s concession stands. He says that no matter what job someone starts in there's potential to become a star.

"You never know when you’re going to find that Levy Legend, as we call it," he says. "We have people who have started off at entry level positions who have worked their way up to management positions."

And all the fans make it fun.

"They have smiles on their faces, the kids are excited and waving their pennants and eating cotton candy...that puts everyone in a good mood," says.

Stand manager Chaquonna Price couldn't agree more.

"You're paid to have fun," she says.

The job is temporary. It ends after the last game of the season.

"I appreciate it; I have fun while it lasts and then on to my next move," says Price.

But with a little bit of luck-or maybe a lot of it-she'll still be having fun during the playoffs late in October.

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